Quick Answer: Should I Use Concrete For Fence Posts?

How do you keep fence posts from rotting in concrete?

The ideal solution is to eliminate contact between soil and wood.

Using a metal post anchor set in concrete is probably the most effective method for achieving maximum longevity.

To help keep the post from wicking water, choose an anchor that spaces the post bottom away from the concrete..

How long does it take for cement to dry for fence posts?

Typically, you can apply some weight to the posts after 4 hours, but it’s a good idea to wait at least 24 hours before resuming fence construction. Standard concrete mixes may take up to two hours to set and should cure for 24 to 48 hours before any forces are applied to the posts.

How deep should a 6 foot fence post be?

2 feetThe depth of the hole should be 1/3-1/2 the post height above ground (i.e., a 6-foot tall fence would require a hole depth of at least 2 feet). Add about 6 inches of QUIKRETE All-Purpose Gravel into the bottom of the hole.

How long should concrete cure for fence posts?

Give it time when dry setting the fence posts Like a good wine, a dry setting concrete will take time to set fully. A quick setting product may not be the best one, and the standard setting time is around four hours. Make sure the post is plumb at all times during the process.

How long does a pressure treated post last in the ground?

The Forest Products Laboratory and other research groups have shown that treated wood stakes placed in the ground for more than 40 years remain rot-free. But young pressure-treated decks, many less than 10 years old, are being shoveled into landfills.

Can you put dry concrete in a post hole?

Fast-setting concrete is ideal for setting posts because there’s no mixing—you simply pour the dry concrete from the bag right into the hole, then add water. … Under normal curing conditions, you can apply heavy weight to the post (a basketball backboard, for example) after just 4 hours.

How long will oak posts last in the ground?

Oak and chestnut products have a durable rating: i.e. last 20+ years with ground contact. Most fencing is softwood: this has a perishable rating, i.e. 2-5 years’ life. All good fencing companies should pressure-treat their timber, thereby extending the life to 10 – 15 years.

What kind of concrete should I use for fence posts?

Fast-setting concrete is ideal for installing fence posts since it doesn’t need to be mixed in a bucket or a wheelbarrow. Once you’ve finished digging your post holes, add about three to four inches of gravel into the bottom and compact it using a post or a 2×4.

Should metal fence posts be set in concrete?

A common rule of thumb is that a 6 ft. tall fence requires at least 2 ft. of post in the ground. … It is recommended that posts be set in concrete for strength and durability.

Will wooden posts rot in concrete?

A: Actually, your point is well taken. Simply setting the posts in concrete does create a condition that will accelerate rot in the bottom of the posts. With pressure-treated posts, the rot will be slow. … Concrete should be poured around the post – no concrete under the post.

How many bags of quikrete do I need for a fence post?

Remember, the depth of the post hole should be one-half of the above-ground post height. (Example: For a 6 feet above ground post, use a post with an overall height of 9 feet and place 3 feet in the ground). The calculator will indicate the number of 50 lb. bags of QUIKRETE® Fast-Setting Concrete you need.

Is 2 feet deep enough for fence posts?

The minimum depth that you should dig your fence post holes for panel sections is 2 feet. A general formula is to dig the holes one-third to one-half of the post’s aboveground height. The deeper you dig the holes, the more stability your fence has, but you must also purchase longer posts.

How much concrete do I need for a metal fence post?

Each hole for the terminal posts must be 8 inches in diameter and 30 inches deep, requiring 0.85 cubic feet of concrete to fill.

How long will untreated fence posts last?

4 to 7 yearsBecause natural durability varies greatly, all untreated woods will have a few early failures. Posts from nondurable-heartwood species, or posts that are largely sapwood, will have an average service life of 4 to 7 years; these posts should be treated with a preservative.